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Moving to Japan/VISAS/THE WORKS/CULTURE?

Moving to Japan/VISAS/THE WORKS/CULTURE? Topic: Moving to Japan/VISAS/THE WORKS/CULTURE?
July 19, 2019 / By Kyrsten
Question: Okay, I've always wanted to live abroad. I'm currently 16 & have been learning Japanese/french for almost a year. I have quite a few questions. 1.What type of visa would I need? I'm hoping to stay there for a few years or more after college. I'm going to double major in Film & Japanese, with minors in creative writing, fashion studies, and graphic design. Obviously, I'm not interested in working in a cubicle for the rest of my life. I read that a work visa will only allow you to do certain things. If necessary, I'll apply for teaching jobs, but what kind of visa would I apply for if I just wanted to work anywhere? Like if I wanted to work at bookstore, restaurant, film studio, publishing company, or working as a free-lance graphic designer while I worked on my books on the side? Not just as a teacher or at a company? Is that even possible? 2. I'm a female & I'm currently 5'11". I have a Japanese pen-pal & they said that it's not likely I would be hired easily due to my outward appearance. What kind of work could I get? Would it be especially hard for me to find an apartment/work looking like I do? Someone is probably going to call me out on being ridiculous, but I'm just asking about what the internet and other people have relayed to me. 3. I have a deep infatuation with tattoos. (All roots back to me being a lover of art) How does Japanese culture perceive tatoos? I know it's usually linked with the yakuza, but there are just some western things I'm just not willing to give up. I will have tattoos. Not necessarily tattoo SLEEVES(its highly possible, though), but maybe just a quarter sleeves or my shoulders and chest. Is it becoming more common for the younger generation to have tattoos? WHAT ABOUT TATOOS ON WOMEN? I'm guessing Japan is slightly more of patriarchal society? (From what I've read & heard, anyway.) Would I be snubbed completely? lol. If I lived there for the rest of my life, I'd probably die an old maid, right? 4. Now, like I said, If necessary, I would get an office job or be a teacher, but I would prefer to do something else. Is it even possible to work for yourself or work from home? 5. BACK TO VISAS & SUCH.How exactly does it work in Japan? I've done research, but I couldn't really make heads or tails of it. I understood some of it, but I've never really been that great at understanding government issues. (I'm a bit mentally deficient when it comes to anything besides computers, art, writing, and the rules of society & such. blahblahblah) Someone said something to me about having to give up citizenship in america, which sounded ludicrous to me. Which is why I was skeptical about it. I wouldn't be going to school or anything, just living/working, like I would be in America after graduating from university. 5. THE ACTUAL MOVING OF ME AND MY STUFF TO JAPAN. If it possible for me to bring big boxes of books or furniture? Books are one of my greatest passion in life, and I collect them. I currently have over 200 books in my room alone. This number will most definitely grow in the next 4-5 years or so. What should I bring? What are the necessities? I HAVE SO MANY MORE QUESTIONS, BUT I DON'T WANT TO BE TOO MUCH OF A NUISANCE.
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Best Answers: Moving to Japan/VISAS/THE WORKS/CULTURE?

Jemma Jemma | 1 day ago
You need a BA / BS degree to work in Japan. Most Americans teach English. Jobs in the other fields you mentioned are almost impossible to get. If a Japanese can do the work, they will always be hired first. Unemployment in Japan has gone up. The recent earthquake / tsunami has made things even worse.. Visible tattoos can be a death blow for any job. Places like public baths won't even let you in. If you need tattoos, Japan isn't for you. You'd only give up your American citizenship if you chose to become a citizen of Japan. That would take over five years of living there, and isn't that easy to get. Bringing such items with you would cost you thousands. Not a good idea when you don't know how long you will be there. Finding a place to stay isn't easy either. Many Japanese won't rent to a non Japanese. And they can get away with it. There's no laws as to who they have to rent to, or not. They can put up a sign that says " Japanese Only ", and that's it. Being 5' 11" might help. People will notice you more ! Being 16, you have a lot of time to think things over. You still have to finish college first & get a BA / BS degree. This is a question & answer page. You can't learn unless you ask.
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Jemma Originally Answered: How many Japan visitor visas can you get in a year?
As a US citizen you can stay up to 90 days on one tourist visa. That is the agreement between the US and Japan. There is a reciprocal agreement for citizens of both countries. Legally, you can go in and out of the country as much as you want. Now if you stay up to days, leave the country and come back right away, the immigration authorities will see that and question you why did you stay 90 days and come back right away. They will be suspicious of what you are doing and why you are a "90 day tourist." Back in 1997-98 I traveled in and out of Japan 25+ times a year on two and four week business trips. I even lost count. No problems for me.
Jemma Originally Answered: How many Japan visitor visas can you get in a year?
From the U.S. you have 90 days each trip without any special visa, as long as you have a valid U.S. passport. You can verify that with the Japanese embassy if you like.

Felicity Felicity
1, You need a working visa to work in Japan. But working visa is granted only on some jobs. >Like if I wanted to work at bookstore, restaurant, film studio, publishing company, or working as a free-lance graphic designer I don't think they will issue a visa for those jobs. 2, >What kind of work could I get? Like I said on #1. Your appearance does not change the answer. >Would it be especially hard for me to find an apartment/work looking like I do? It does not affect your apartment hunting. But it may, on jobs. 3, >How does Japanese culture perceive tatoos? As you know, tattoo is related to yakuza and not a good thing in Japan. >Is it becoming more common for the younger generation to have tattoos? WHAT ABOUT TATOOS ON WOMEN? I don't think so. >Would I be snubbed completely? lol. I'm not sure. You are not even in Japan now. So there is no accurate answer. >If I lived there for the rest of my life, I'd probably die an old maid, right? You can't live in Japan for the rest of your life so easily. If you are talking about staying single by old maid, many men and women in Japan are staying single now. So it's not just you, but many Japanese men and women. 4, No. There is no visa for that. 5, >How exactly does it work in Japan? You are hired by a Japanese company. And the company and you will apply for working visa. 6?, >If it possible for me to bring big boxes of books or furniture? If you pay to a moving company, you can bring anything. >What should I bring? What are the necessities? You can buy anything in Japan. So you can move to Japan without anything if you don't want.
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Courtney Courtney
1.) Unlikely. Odds are you are going to fall under the specialist in humanities visa. 2.) I have no clue what you look like but I will say it's not that easy to get an apartment here in Japan if you are not Japanese. I was turned down 4 times before I found a gaijin friendly rental place. 3.) Yes tattoos are frowned upon mostly. This will make apartment hunting even harder IMO. You won't be cast into the depths of hell for having tats here but I can't see a work place being thrilled about your tats. Also onsens and pools might not be that pleased either. Relationship wise it depends as my Japanese friends who have lived overseas for a while are more tolerant and accepting 4.) You just show up and get a job. The company does the paperwork (hopefully the right way) and you go to immigration and get the tourist visa changed to a work one You don't have to get rid of your USA citizenship and I am fairly sure it is 15 years (or is it 20?) before you can even apply for permanent residency in Japan. 5.) No just no. Your place is going to be SMALL here and you won't have room for such things. For furniture just find someone leaving online who is having a sayonara sale. Necessities? Deodorant, decent clothes and money.
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Courtney Originally Answered: How did history affect Japan's culture?
Many factors have contributed to the formation of the japanese culture. In terms of shintoism, japan's indigenous faith, hinduism and chinese taoism have been of significant importance. The japanese luck goddess Benzaiten came from the hindu Lakshmi. Many elements of chinese culture, like origami have also shaped the japanese way of life. If your a fan of japanese manga, heres a tidbit for your tabloid: America influenced modern manga after WWll after japan was exposed to cartoons. Before, they used woodblock and ink on paper but America influenced more creative artistry and ideas:).

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