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Now that the UN has admitted solar panels cause far greater damage to our environment that even Coal?

Now that the UN has admitted solar panels cause far greater damage to our environment that even Coal? Topic: Now that the UN has admitted solar panels cause far greater damage to our environment that even Coal?
July 18, 2019 / By Marissa
Question: What will liberals latch onto next for a viable power source http://www.thescienceforum.com/physics/21485-solar-panels-contribute-global-warming-their-use.html http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-11-01/its-global-warming-stupid
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Best Answers: Now that the UN has admitted solar panels cause far greater damage to our environment that even Coal?

Kristina Kristina | 10 days ago
Are you also aware that the IPCC has also backtracked on man made global warming and are now admitting that the real cause is the same source that we deniers have been claiming all along? http://www.setyoufreenews.com/2013/02/06...
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Kristina Originally Answered: I was looking into solar panels!?
I have included the link to sources of information that will help you calculate your solar panel cost, need, and amount of roof space. You need to know how much kW you use a month for the calculations. The great thing is the calculator will take into account you area, utility, and state rebates or incentives. I would recommend doing your homework on what to expect and the components involved. For myself, I would hire a contractor to do the work on the roof and for a guarantee of some sort.
Kristina Originally Answered: I was looking into solar panels!?
In this economy, you may actually get a lower package price from a professional than buying the parts yourself for self-install. The street rumors are that the largest distributors are buying panels from the manufacturers for as little at $1.50 / watt right now, and the best you can do is about twice that at places like sunelec.com . Shop around, get several bids. They may vary widely. We did a self install several years ago. 3 kW of panels provides enough electricity for our house in San Jose, California, but we have no A/C, no pool pump, and our heat and cooking is natural gas. The array is 225 square feet, approximately, so is far less than the roof area. The only way to size a system for your particular house is to get a free quote from a pro.
Kristina Originally Answered: I was looking into solar panels!?
You need to make a bit of computation about your need and your utilites. An average household may need between 7Kw - 8Kw of power to support the whole shabang. 50 solar panels of 200 watts may give you a good 6 - 7 Kw power (depending on your sunny days). Since solar array is designed to work in series you have to make sure it is not shaded by any tree at any given time of day, otherwise the whole series will not work. Your expense may go up to 80K but you may qualify of govt. rebates and tax breakes. Including professional installation costs, you may consider other things like inverter, charge controller, batteries and meters.
Kristina Originally Answered: I was looking into solar panels!?
Read your electric bill - it's counted in Kilowatt-hours per month. The U.S. average is about 950 Kw-hr per month, but your usage can vary from this quite a bit depending on things like air conditioning and electrical heating or cooking. The average sunlight per month is around 170 hours - again this can vary widely but can be looked up for your area. Using these averages, you would need about 5.5 kilowatts of panel. At about 10 watts per square foot this would be 550 square feet. Cost right now is about $3.5 / watt, so panel cost is just under $20k. Installation would roughly double this figure. A Do-it-yourselfer could save substantially on installed cost. You would need electrician skills, carpentry/roofing skills for the mounting, and solar surveying capability to assure you that the array doesn't get shadowed. Your cost would be strongly influenced by the amount of government/utility aid available in your area to offset up-front costs. Your utility company could tell you about this. I'm off-grid. My 0.85 Kilowatt solar array feeds 10 marine type 12v batteries that power a refrigerator, 3 rooms of lighting, 2 computers, a home entertainment center, and a microwave. Learning to not waste electricity will save you substantially on your installed costs.

Kristina Originally Answered: Should we subsidize solar panels?
Recent investments into solar panels have brought about a couple of interesting realizations and developments. One, as you state, is that traditional solar panels (silicon crystalline panels) are not currently cost effective, even will full-scale manufacturing production. It's possible that improved manufacturing techniques will bring the retail price down somewhat, but it needs to be brought down a lot to make economic sense without incentives. The other, though, is that a new method of producing solar panels - thin film technologies - has been developed. These are currently quite expensive, but because there are no crystals to grow, they are expected to drop significantly in price as production increases. I believe that this technological development has been made as a direct result of government support for solar energy. It is not taking money away from research - rather it is providing the incentive for research. I could be wrong. I've been wrong before. But I think that these new solar technologies, which are already hitting the market, will dramatically change the economics of solar energy.
Kristina Originally Answered: Should we subsidize solar panels?
Yes, they should. The problem with the professor's argument is that it's a purely economic one. It neglects the need for alternative energy technology due to both global warming and declining oil production. Another key is in this line: "We are throwing away money by installing the current solar PV technology," he said. Current solar technology perhaps, but as Rivergirl points out, solar technology is advancing rapidly, and thin film solar will probably soon replace photovoltaics. "Prices for solar electric power have fallen 90% in the last decade and further steep drops in price are highly likely. By 2016 solar electric power could be cost-competitive with coal and natural gas fired power plants. (Some solar industry spokesmen say it may happen within five years)." http://www.democracyinaction.org/dia/org... Bottom line is that government subsidies encourage people to buy solar panels, and make it possible for many who could otherwise not afford it. The more solar panels are purchased, the more the price will go down, and the more quickly the technology will be able to advance.
Kristina Originally Answered: Should we subsidize solar panels?
I know for my friends that live out in the country in an off-the-grid house, it would cost a lot more to run power lines and buy into the coal-powered electrical grid than it does for them to own a few panels and batteries and use the passive solar design of their house. They also have a propane-powered stove and refrigerator and use a wood stove for heat when it gets below 10 degrees. In that sense, the panels and batteries are definitely worth the expense. I think we should definitely subsidize solar hot water, passive solar and parbolic troughs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parabolic_t... geothermal, wind and small-scale hydroelectric (small turbines in creeks) in addition to photovoltaic cells. But between new manufacturing techniques, different technologies and more effective batteries, I think they will be more worthwhile and affordable for the general public in the future.

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