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Why is Mercutio in Baz Luhrmanns versioon of Romeo and Juliet black? and in the 1968 version he's white?

Why is Mercutio in Baz Luhrmanns versioon of Romeo and Juliet black? and in the 1968 version he's white? Topic: Why is Mercutio in Baz Luhrmanns versioon of Romeo and Juliet black? and in the 1968 version he's white?
June 20, 2019 / By Aline
Question: Why is Mercutio in Baz Luhrmanns versioon of Romeo and Juliet black? and in the 1968 version he's white? just pure curiosity for my essay is it because he wants it to be clear that he's not a member of either family? Also , why is the prince white in 1968s film (zeffirelli) and black in lurhmanns? please answer
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Best Answers: Why is Mercutio in Baz Luhrmanns versioon of Romeo and Juliet black? and in the 1968 version he's white?

Ulick Ulick | 3 days ago
In the actual Shakespeare play, Mercutio is described as a "Moor". Shakespeare had many black characters which makes the narrative slightly accurate in which moors were prevalent in that time still. Othello is also another Moor character.
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Ulick Originally Answered: Romeo and Juliet question: Is Mercutio's curse the only one portrayed throughout the play?
Mercutio's is the only curse that actually works, but in Act 3 scene 2, the Nurse says "Shame come to Romeo!" (minor curse) and Juliet replies "Blistered be thy tongue for such a wish!" If I were you I would just stick to writing about Mercutio's curse.
Ulick Originally Answered: Romeo and Juliet question: Is Mercutio's curse the only one portrayed throughout the play?
Strictly speaking Mercutio utters the only curse... three times. However, for an essay you could include the Prince's admonition "on pain of death" that the feuding cease and Capulet's warning to Juliet that she will be ddisowned if she does not obey him. Go get us an A.
Ulick Originally Answered: Romeo and Juliet question: Is Mercutio's curse the only one portrayed throughout the play?
i just wrote an essay like that and when i asked the professor about that question i was given the answer, yes, that is the only one spoken of in dialog in the play

Ulick Originally Answered: How would you describe Romeo (from the play 'Romeo & Juliet') before he meets Juliet?
**Before Romeo meets Juliet, he is a sorrowful character who's unrequited love for Rosaline has caused him to isolate himself from his family. (the montagues)** This is shown during the conversation between Mr and Mrs Montague about their sons actions. They are concerned over his actions because he is convinced there is no one else, that is he cannot marry Rosaline then his life is over. He sulks all day, every day- and his friends and family grow more and more concerned as he used to be a fun-loving character of sorts. His friends (Mecrutio etc) manage to convince Romeo to gate-crash the Capulets ball in the hope that some fun would snap him back into reality. Romeo reluctantly attends, and there meets Juliet. We are shown his complete transformation as he remarks "Ne'er have I seen true beauty till this night". Romeo has instantly forgotten his unrequited love for Rosaline, and has changed into the lustful, romantic, impulsive character we see throughout the rest of the play. Hope this is helpful, and not too late for your assignment!
Ulick Originally Answered: How would you describe Romeo (from the play 'Romeo & Juliet') before he meets Juliet?
I don't know how much this will help but I think Romeo was a "mans man" before meeting juliet. It wasn't unlike him to stay out all night drinking, or getting into fights (especially with the capulets), but he was a good man. He had his heart broken by his first love, Rosaline (I believe) and was afraid he would never love again. Then he meets Juliet and discovers what love really is. Hope I helped :)

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