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The most common isotope of hydrogen contains an electron and proton seperated byb about 5x10^-5m. The elementary unit (see details for rest)?

The most common isotope of hydrogen contains an electron and proton seperated byb about 5x10^-5m. The elementary unit (see details for rest)? Topic: The most common isotope of hydrogen contains an electron and proton seperated byb about 5x10^-5m. The elementary unit (see details for rest)?
June 16, 2019 / By Avital
Question: the most common isotope of hydrogen contains an electron and proton seperated byb about 5x10^-5m. The elementary unit of charge is 1.6x10^-19 C. Determine the force of attraction between the two particles. I would really love to know how to solve this problem, I know I would use the distance and the 9x10^9, but what else would I use? Thank You!
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Best Answers: The most common isotope of hydrogen contains an electron and proton seperated byb about 5x10^-5m. The elementary unit (see details for rest)?

Abigil Abigil | 9 days ago
It will be simple equation Energy of attraction = (1.6*10^(-19))^2/(5*10^(-5)) =0.5*10^(-33 )J Now multiply this with 1/(4 pi e0) e0=8.8 *10^-9 The energy will be 0.5/(4 pi 8.8) 10^(-24) J=4.52*10^(-21) J This will be the answer. Your multiplication number is e0. It should be 1/9 *10^9
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Abigil Originally Answered: Rn-222 Stable Isotope of Radon?
Radon has NO stable isotopes. Radon-222 is the most stable of all of the radon isotopes, but radon-222 is not a stable isotope. On the periodic table, the numbers in parentheses where the atomic weight would normally be are the mass numbers of the most stable isotopes. But it also means that there are no isotopes stable enough to get a meaningful atomic weight.
Abigil Originally Answered: Rn-222 Stable Isotope of Radon?
According to wikipedia: "Radon has no stable isotopes" and according to www.ptable.com: for elements with no stable isotopes (i.e. radon) the mass number given is for the isotope with the longest half-life

Abigil Originally Answered: Radioactive Isotope disintegrations?
The radioactive decay equation is: N(t) = N(0)*exp(-L*t) where N(0) is the quantity of radioactive material present initially N(t) is the quantity of radioactive material remaining at time t L is the radioactive decay constant = ln(2)/halflife The number of decays that have happened between times t=0 and t=t is then N(0) - N(t), so # decays = N(0)*(1-exp(-L*t)) In this case, L = ln(2)/8.1 day = 5.943*10^-5 min^-1 N(0) = 1.4 moles # decays =1.4 moles * (1 - exp(-5.943*10^-5 min^-1 * 15 min)) # decays =1.247*10^-3 mol Multiplying by Avogadro's number to get the number of actual decays: # decays = 1.247*10^-3 * 6.022*10^23 atoms/mol # decays = 7.512*10^20 atoms decayed
Abigil Originally Answered: Radioactive Isotope disintegrations?
here are some formulas that might help you. the decay constant = ln2/half-life number of molecules (at time t) = original numbr of molecules *e^(-decay constant * time). 1. convert all the "times" into seconds and the moles in number of molecules (number of molecules = moles* avogadros constant) 2. calculate the decay constant. 3. calculate the number of molecules remaining after time t. 4. find the number of disintegration by subtracting the original number of molecules to the number of molecules remaining (calculated in 3). hope it helps!

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