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Existentialism in The Stranger by Albert Camus?

Existentialism in The Stranger by Albert Camus? Topic: Existentialism in The Stranger by Albert Camus?
June 26, 2019 / By Carly
Question: I have an essay to type up about The Stranger and it's Existentialism. Please, in simple and short form explain what Existentialism is in The Stranger. Or give one example. Just need a little help here. Thank you.
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Best Answers: Existentialism in The Stranger by Albert Camus?

Anette Anette | 5 days ago
If I recall correctly, the book begins with the main character stating matter-of-factly that his mother "died yesterday or perhaps it was the day before yesterday". His attitude was so non-chalant, which is characteristic of an existentialist world view (i.e., life itself is unimportant).
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Anette Originally Answered: Sartre's existentialism and the insistence on the absence of god?
Not really. Your "facticity" appears to be an invented word but fully defined and consistently used. What is "existence proceeds essence"? Simplify your language, and your meaning might be clear. Did you mean existence precedes essence? Or the entirely opposite existence proceeds from essence? Or something else? I would differ. Sartre sees existence as itself, no more, no less, and he really doesn't think much of it. He sees nothing else except inventive storytelling - to him, irrelevant lies. He sees no evidence for other experience prior to, beside, or after the wysiwyg (what you see is what you get) context we inhabit. He doesn't like it. He doesn't like it being all there is. And he does not feel obligated to follow optimism. Jonathan Swift would have been an existentialist who believed in a moral essence before, during and after the experience we name life. He wrote the essay on "solving the Irish question" with an absolute goal in mind. (He suggested feeding Irish babies to Irish adults as the solution to mass starvation in Ireland when the potato crops were destroyed by blight. His goal was to rouse indignation to see the Irish fed - but the indignation he roused was focused on shutting him up and removing him from the ministry.) Personally, Sartre's nihilism totally pained my heart. Try Camus, "L'etrangere" or "The Stranger." Be very cautious in approaching nihilism or satire. They are powerful, and often dominate when one breaks social conditioning against free thinking. Strive to be free but whole.
Anette Originally Answered: Sartre's existentialism and the insistence on the absence of god?
This is a very good question you've asked. I think what you said makes a lot of sense. I would say that the decision of whether or not one is going to believe in God is a basic one and precedes everything else. I don't think that decision is made on the basis of logic per se. So it seems to me that Sartre's denial of a strict moral guideline would follow from his atheism, not the other way around as you suggest. Why it is so important for Sartre to deny the existence of God--there's really no way to answer that. He just doesn't believe. It's the way he looks at the world. But his atheism is so much more intelligent than most people's theism. To me, the "existence" of God (it's not existence in the sense that we know the word, since it is non-created) is so obvious as to hardly be even worth discussing. But I think that atheism can be an authentic position. I think it's just that the atheist sees the non-personal aspect of God. As for morality: it is the phenomenological experience of every human being that right and wrong, good and bad, exist. Even if someone theorizes intellectually that the universe is completely random and accidental, that there is no basis except personal preference for saying anything is better than anything else, that's not how he actually lives his life. One may be able to maintain such a position while sitting in one's armchair, but when the stuff starts hitting the fan it becomes a lot more difficult. The "no atheists in foxholes" sort of thing. Try sitting on a hot stove and maintaining the position that it isn't wrong. Every fiber of your physical being cries out that it is wrong. Because, on the biological level, it is wrong; it is actually immoral. At the biological level, the maintanence of physical integrity is a value, the highest value; it is moral. It's not mere personal preference or an evolutionary accident. It is the basic impulse of life itself as expressed at that level. Sartre asserted that we are completely free? Let's see him be free of that impulse. And it's the same for the higher evolutionary levels of life--the social, the intellectual (I'm following Robert Pirsig here). The purpose of life is to evolve, to grow, to expand, to become more and more. Life resists disintegration. Extreme disintegration of the social or intellectual order of things would be as painful to us as sitting on a hot stove. That's the basic impulse of life. That is our essence. Where you want to say that essence comes from--I don't know that it matters so much. I think perhaps both you and Sartre could essentially agree with all this. You and I might say the essence comes from the Creator, and Sartre might say it is just life itself. Whether or not you want to call this a "strict moral guideline", it is the basis of morality. Morality is simply the highest quality response to a situation--whatever allows the greatest evolution.

Wiley Wiley
Some one desires to learn how you can use spark notes "The Stranger is almost always known as an “existential” novel, but this description isn't necessarily accurate. The term “existentialism” is a broad and some distance-reaching classification that means many exceptional things to many distinctive folks, and is more often than not misapplied or overapplied. As it's most ordinarily used, existentialism refers back to the inspiration that there's no “larger” meaning to the universe or to man’s existence, and no rational order to the routine of the world. In step with this common definition of existentialism, human lifestyles will not be invested with a redemptive or asserting motive—there's nothing past man’s bodily existence. Some recommendations in the Stranger certainly resemble this working definition of existentialism, but the broader philosophy of existentialism includes features far past this definition that are not gift in the Stranger. In addition, Camus himself rejected the appliance of the “existential” label to The Stranger. For this reason, this SparkNote approaches The Stranger from the philosophical point of view of the absurd. “The absurd” is a term Camus himself coined, and a philosophy that he himself developed. Studying The Stranger with Camus’s philosophy of the absurd in intellect sheds a good deal of light on the text. Although Camus’s philosophical ideas resonate strongly within the textual content, it's important to maintain in mind that The Stranger is a novel, no longer a philosophical essay. When reading the novel, personality development, plot, and prose form demand simply as a lot awareness because the specifics of the absurd. This SparkNote simplest discusses the absurd when such dialogue supplies perception on the textual content. Otherwise, the focus of this SparkNote remains on the textual content itself, as with any first-rate work of literature."
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Saxon Saxon
Some one needs to learn how to use spark notes "The Stranger is often referred to as an “existential” novel, but this description is not necessarily accurate. The term “existentialism” is a broad and far-reaching classification that means many different things to many different people, and is often misapplied or overapplied. As it is most commonly used, existentialism refers to the idea that there is no “higher” meaning to the universe or to man’s existence, and no rational order to the events of the world. According to this common definition of existentialism, human life is not invested with a redemptive or affirming purpose—there is nothing beyond man’s physical existence. Some ideas in The Stranger clearly resemble this working definition of existentialism, but the broader philosophy of existentialism includes aspects far beyond this definition that are not present in The Stranger. Moreover, Camus himself rejected the application of the “existential” label to The Stranger. Hence, this SparkNote approaches The Stranger from the philosophical perspective of the absurd. “The absurd” is a term Camus himself coined, and a philosophy that he himself developed. Reading The Stranger with Camus’s philosophy of the absurd in mind sheds a good deal of light on the text. Although Camus’s philosophical ideas resonate strongly within the text, it is important to keep in mind that The Stranger is a novel, not a philosophical essay. When reading the novel, character development, plot, and prose style demand just as much attention as the specifics of the absurd. This SparkNote only discusses the absurd when such discussion provides insight on the text. Otherwise, the focus of this SparkNote remains on the text itself, as with any great work of literature."
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Saxon Originally Answered: Can someone explain to me in simple terms what pragmatism and existentialism are?
Pragmatism, I believe, was a movement in American philosophy that argues that a statement is true if it produced positive results. For example, a pragmatist might argue that we might as well think freewill exists b/c if it does not exist then moral responsibility does not exist. In other worlds, philosophy is only useful when applied to benefit actual life. William James was a pragmatist. Existentialism was a post world war II movement that dealt with issues of every day living. An existentialist might ask, "What does it mean to be," or "What is the purpose of life." Because these are ordinary questions, many existential novels revolved around the everyday lives of average people opposed to royalty or the rich. Though existentialism is often associated with finding a meaning to life in a secular society, some existentialists were religious. hope that helps:)!

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